FAQ’s

Does Hot Stuff™ work on everything?

Almost any materials or combination of materials can be bonded with (Hot Stuff) glues.

How do I know how much glue to use?

A good rule of thumb is that one drop covers one square inch of non-porous material. Of course, more glue is needed if the material is porous and soaks up the glue.

Why doesn't the glue always dry instantly?

There are several factors which determine how fast instant glue will dry. A common reason for CA glue not drying is that the glue being used is too thin for the joint. If CA glue is not being pressed between two surfaces and has not had accelerator applied, it will take a long time to cure, and if the glue is too thin for the application, it will still not create a bond when it does cure.

Another factor in curing time is the material being bonded. Different substrates cause instant glue to dry at different speeds. When bonding rubber or neoprene, for example, the glue will dry extremely quickly, while materials such as polycarbonate tend to take a bit longer.

Oils and other contamination on the surfaces can cause the glue to bond slowly, weakly, or not at all. Lack of humidity in the air can also affect curing times. Alsom, the more instant glue that is used in a given bond area, the slower the cure will be.

How do I know which Hot Stuff™ to use?

Use Hot Stuff™ Original when the fit is very tight and the material is non-porous. (i.e. piece of plastic and a piece of flat rubber). Use Super ‘T’™ or Special ‘T’™ when parts don’t fit well. (I.e. two pieces of unsanded wood) or for very porous materials such as the end grain of a piece of wood. Naturally, more porous material requires thicker glue.

How do I align the parts before the glue cures?

Check out our video on the home page of The Glue Guy demonstrating how to properly glue a chair.

If the materials are relatively non-porous, do all the positioning first. Once a perfect fit is achieved, apply Hot Stuff Original to the joint. If necessary, Hot Stuff™ may be applied to more than one location along the bond line. Example: bonding two one-inch rubber cubes together. Four small applications, one at each side, would be in order.

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